15 Comments

Cloudware – The New Storage

Storage in the Clouds

According to pcmag.com, “Software that runs in or comes from a network server (the cloud). It often refers to Web-based applications.”  It reduces what is stored locally on personal computers.  Google, Microsoft Office 2013, icloud for Apple, Prezi, Snagit, Picasa, and Flickr are types of cloudware.  Many companies and school districts are using the cloud to reduce the amount of storage on computers and servers.  Cloudware allows for the average person the ability to store documents, pictures, and other types of forms in the cloud.

There are many thoughts about cloudware.  Digital natives are open to the idea of cloudware because they understand the benefits of having data available 24/7 from any computer and from anywhere in the world.  However, digital immigrants tend to be a little hesitant about storing data somewhere that is not in their person possession.  They are afraid of security and loss of privacy.

Many school districts are doing away with textbooks and providing e readers for their students.  There is not anyway you can store that much data on an e reader.  However, the e reader can access the school cloudware and have access to the different textbooks at a touch on the screen.  The William S. Hart Union High School District is preparing for this type of cloudware and e readers for all students.

I guess I am between the digital natives and digital immigrants.  I do have concerns about privacy and security.  However, I know that with cloudware, the world will be available to my students in a way they never thought possible.  Students will be engaged in learning by collaborating with others using Google Drive and other forms of online cloudware.  Either way, we need to accept that is already happening and enjoy the ride.  I wonder what next thing is coming our way.

Encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved 4 29, 2013, from http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/58289/cloudware: http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/58289/cloudware

According to pcmag.com, “Software that runs in or comes from a network server (the cloud). It often refers to Web-based applications.”  It reduces what is stored locally on personal computers.  Google, Microsoft Office 2013, icloud for Apple, Prezi, Snagit, Picasa, and Flickr are types of cloudware.  Many companies and school districts are using the cloud to reduce the amount of storage on computers and servers.  Cloudware allows for the average person the ability to store documents, pictures, and other types of forms in the cloud.

There are many thoughts about cloudware.  Digital natives are open to the idea of cloudware because they understand the benefits of having data available 24/7 from any computer and from anywhere in the world.  However, digital immigrants tend to be a little hesitant about storing data somewhere that is not in their person possession.  They are afraid of security and loss of privacy.

Many school districts are doing away with textbooks and providing e readers for their students.  There is not anyway you can store that much data on an e reader.  However, the e reader can access the school cloudware and have access to the different textbooks at a touch on the screen.  The William S. Hart Union High School District is preparing for this type of cloudware and e readers for all students.

I guess I am between the digital natives and digital immigrants.  I do have concerns about privacy and security.  However, I know that with cloudware, the world will be available to my students in a way they never thought possible.  Students will be engaged in learning by collaborating with others using Google Drive and other forms of online cloudware.  Either way, we need to accept that is already happening and enjoy the ride.  I wonder what next thing is coming our way.

Devices that use cloudware
Online Cloudware
Accessing the cloud from anywhere in the world

Encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved 4 29, 2013, from http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/58289/cloudware: http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/58289/cloudware

https://www.google.com/

http://www.techsmith.com/

office.microsoft.com/

http://prezi.com/

https://www.icloud.com/

http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/

http://picasa.google.com/

Photos courtesy of:

https://www.google.com/search?q=photos+of+cloudware&client=firefox&hs=QyD&rls=com.yahoo:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=F554UefAIKLoigKq4YHIBg&ved=0CDEQsAQ&biw=1600&bih=728

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15 comments on “Cloudware – The New Storage

  1. I am not sure why it posted like this. I edited the post but it still is showing up with it copying the text twice. LOL, I am too afraid to doing anything else to the post because it will mess up the comment section. Happy reading ….lol

  2. Yay! I can finally comment on your posts!

    • It was fun meeting you today! You got to see Project Based Learning in practice. My students enjoy being able to apply what they have learned through writing. As you can see, Sped students benefit from using a engaged/application approach.

  3. I have no flipping clue why it finally worked out. I am sure not touching anything…lol

  4. Cynthia, it is funny – although I consider myself a digital native, the “Cloud” was still an adjustment for me! I just did not get it! I also had and still have, the same reservations regarding privacy that you express. I wonder if my fears/confusion were similar to what digital immigrants feel on a daily basis? It seems strange to me that someone in who knows where is managing a server that may hold all of my pictures, or my school documents. I guess that is just the world we live in, though. I do agree with you that the Cloud has provided student collaboration in ways we never thought possible.

  5. Hi Cynthia, great referencing of resources such as pcmag.com. I do agree with your sentiments upon the “cloud” and that “it is a little unnerving” to put our professional, educational, or even personal information in the hands of someone or some company, and to have very little information as to what rights to privacy and protections we have against our information being used by individuals or companies, to make their provision of these services a worth while transaction for them. While I am not against this shift, for the reasons of access to constantly updated programs and services without the hassle and clutter on ones personal device, at a fair or even “freemium” cost, like any situation in life it is wise to be skeptical, not cynical, and to see the benefits and pitfalls to becoming completely invested without a plan B. One valuable perspective to consider, brought to light in a blog titled “Beware of the Cloud,” offers the consideration that while accessing information and documents stored in cloudware is appealing because of the convenience of using any computer anywhere there is internet service, there also has to be internet service, and if that piece of the puzzle provides issues, when internet providers go offline due to issues on their end, that convenience, can quickly become an inconvenience, when relied upon completely. This blog “Beware of the Cloud” also highlights the fact that cloudware such as gmail, is provided for free, but the catch is that “the service scans all incoming and outgoing email for keywords, which they use to advertise useless crap to their users.”
    I do completely concur that taking advantage of these services on the internet, can provide valuable tools for both storage and access to information, but as usual, I also see that there are always multiple facets to consider, not to be uniformed or unprepared for dealing with “Murphy’s law” if and when it occurs.

    The Blog I referenced was posted by commontater on 04/02/07 and can be found at:
    http://awindow.tblog.com/post/1969943597

    • Eric,
      I so agree. I have to prepare my students for the future. Today, I did a lesson on how to create a Google document for my seniors. I made sure I explained about what not to put into a document. I also warned them about sharing to freely on the internet. I gave them the websites we have been using and cautioned about what they posted or shared.
      However, it is exciting to see them become engaged in the process. My students are behind in technology and applications when it comes to writing. For that, I am extremely excited about having these tools to prepare them for their future.
      Cindy

  6. So happy that I can reply back…Cute video. I agree with you about using Cloudware in the classroom but I still believe strongly in book, pen, and paper. I guess that comes from being around the younger students. I can see the advantages in HS because you are preparing them for life skills. I see the pro and cons of technology in our future. We need to use it to stay connected , but not fall a slave to it and forget how to interact with one another.

    Jennifer

    • My students gave me a fit today because I made them write out their resumes since they forgot to type them this weekend. Lol, you would have thought I was creating the unpardonable sin.

  7. Cindy,
    A few weeks ago I learned that one of the schools I sub for was also thinking about getting rid of textbooks and providing students with e-readers. I agree with you, we have to just flow with all the changes happening and it truly is exciting. We have to prepare our students for the future and it seems like cloudware is the one of the first steps.
    Claudia

    • Claudia,
      If we don’t, we will be doing our students am injustice. I talk to tomorrow to my assistant principal about a class that is based on project based learning.

  8. Frankly, I am a digital native, but that includes one’s ability to hack online stores of data. While students most certainly will have an easier time accessing E-Readers than enough textbooks to break their back, it also makes it much easier for that data to be hacked, if it is all in the same place. Ways to make this more difficult is to create hardware gaps between the cloud, and the internet. Hackers need access to the cloud in order to change the coding, and without that attachment, their hacks are impossible to implement. A digital native can learn this, but they have to pay attention to the software they are growing up with in order to protect themselves from malicious acts against their data stores.

    Long story short, I think the issue of security exists just as easily in Digital natives as it is in Digital immigrants. The problem is, like much of human history, is that the majority of any generation’s population tends to have issues seeing the “whole” picture, until of course the real world has been forced into their perspective. I believe, as educators, that teaching the students methods of protecting their digital information – no matter how basic or “archaic” the methods, such as disconnecting the hardline to one’s computer when the person is not online – will be another priority in this new future. That is, if we have time to teach it to them with all the other stuff our future students will need to know.

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